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Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Association Between Symptoms of Depression and Self-rated Mental Health Among Older Adults

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Keywords:

older adults, depression,racial/ethnic differences, disparities

Contact:

David Chiriboga, PhD

Abstract

The study examined racial/ethnic differences in the association between symptoms of depression and self-rated mental health among older adults. Data came from the first wave of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a population-based study of non-institutionalized older adults aged 57 to 85. The sample consisted of non-Hispanic Whites (n = 2,110), Blacks (n = 509), and Hispanics (n = 304). The association between symptoms of depression and self-rated mental health was weaker among minority groups than that among non-Hispanic Whites. Tests of interaction effects showed that the predictability of depressive symptoms to self-rated mental health was substantially weakened among Blacks of advanced ages and Hispanics with multiple chronic conditions. The study explored potential sources of racial/ethnic differences in subjective reports of mental health and called attention to older minorities with advanced ages and cormorbid conditions in mental health services and interventions.

Citation

Jang, Y., Park, N. S., Kang, S.-Y., & Chiriboga, D. A. (2013). Racial/ethnic differences in the association between symptoms of depression and self-rated mental health among older adults. Community Mental Health Journal, Advance online publication.  doi:10.1007/s10597-013-9642-2

 

Faculty & Staff